California History Timeline, May 6 to May 13

May 6

Ranchos in 1834
Rancho Milpitas was deeded. The name comes from the Nahuatl word for maize and could be translated “little cornfields.” It covered 4,458-acres in today’s Santa Clara County.

Milpitas.

Milpitas.

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce.

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce.

Business in 1850 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce began. Today it represents some 1,500 member business organizations and their 200,000 employees. 

Clubs in 1860
The Olympic Club in San Francisco was organized as an gymnastic club by the Lafayette Hook and Ladder Company. Today it is the oldest athletic club in the U.S. and hosted U.S. Golf Opens in 1955, 1966, 1987, 1998 and 2012.

The Olympic Club from the 18th fairway.

The Olympic Club from the 18th fairway.

Race relations in 1882
The Chinese Exclusion Act passed. It ended all immigration of Chinese laborers. Chinese immigrants worked in the Gold Rush and built railroads but racial prejudice only grew over time. The Act was repealed in 1943.

Lassen Peak eruption (1915). Photograph by R.E. Stinson.

Lassen Peak eruption (1915). Photograph by R.E. Stinson.

Government in 1907
President Theodore Roosevelt declared Lassen Peak and Cinder Cone as U.S. National Monuments. Today the area is Lassen Volcanic National Park. The peak is the largest plug dome volcano in the world and the southern-most volcano in the Cascade Range.

Hollywood in 1941
Bob Hope led a group of celebrities in his first USO show at March Field, near Riverside. His shows included comedians, singers, actors and actresses who gave their time and talent to troops and families around the world.

Japanese American Internment in 1942
Fresno, Merced and Sacramento Assembly Centers opened. They were part of the forced detention of approximately 110,000 Californians of Japanese ancestry during World War II. Assembly centers were used to securely move people to the ten internment prisons.

Sports in 1974 
Paul Lindblad, Oakland A’s pitcher, made a wild throw in first inning of a 6-3 loss to the Baltimore Orioles. That ended his record streak of 385 consecutive errorless games.

May 7

Ranchos in 1846
Rancho Boca de la Playa was deeded. Its name means ‘mouth of the beach.’ It covered 6,607 acres in today’s Orange County, along the coast from present day San Juan Capistrano to San Clemente. The Pablo Pryor Adobe Hide House is among the oldest standing adobe dwellings in California.

Rancho diseno

Rancho diseno

San Francisco Municipal Airport, Mills Field.

San Francisco Municipal Airport, Mills Field.

Airports in 1927 
San Francisco Municipal Airport, Mills Field, was dedicated. It had a 13-by-14-foot public waiting room, a lunchroom, and sleeping quarters. To get there, cars crossed a one-lane bridge over the canal running along the unpaved Bayshore Highway.

Japanese American Internment in 1942
Pinedale and Pomona Assembly Centers opened. One was built on a former mill workers housing area. The other was on the Los Angeles County Fairgrounds. Both were part of the forced detention of approximately 110,000 Californians of Japanese ancestry during World War II. Assembly centers were used to securely move people to the ten internment prisons.

Nick DeJohn.

Nick DeJohn.

Crime in 1947
Nick DeJohn, a Chicago Mafia gangster, was strangled and his body stuffed into the trunk of a car in San Francisco. He had reportedly fled Chicago after murdering several other gang members and was living in Santa Rosa under an alias.

Crime in 1954
A San Francisco jury decided that Harold Jackson and Joseph Lear should be executed for kidnapping Leonard Moskowitz. Their sentences were later changed to life in prison and both men died in San Quentin.

Shark attacks in 1959 
Albert Kogler, San Francisco State College student, died following a shark attack while swimming off Baker Beach. Shirley O’Neill, also a San Francisco State College student, pulled her friend to the beach.

Sports in 1959
At “Roy Campanella Night” at the Los Angeles Coliseum, 93,103 fans watched Sandy Koufax, Dodgers’ pitcher, beat the New York Yankees, 6-2. Baseball’s biggest crowd was for an exhibition game.

"Roy Campanella Night" at the Los Angeles Coliseum (1959).

“Roy Campanella Night” at the Los Angeles Coliseum (1959).

Norm Sherry.

Norm Sherry.

Sports in 1960  
Norm Sherry, Los Angeles Dodgers catcher, hit a home run to win the game against the Philadelphia Phillies, 3-2, for his brother Larry Sherry, Dodgers pitcher.

Accidents in 1964 
Pacific Air Lines Flight 773 crashed near San Ramon, killing all 44 aboard. The FBI later reported that a cockpit recorder tape indicated the pilot and co-pilot were shot by a suicidal passenger.

Raiders logo.

Raiders logo.

Sports in 1982 
The Raiders moved from Oakland to Los Angeles. The team returned to Oakland in 1995.

Weather in 1987 
Temperature reached 105°F in Sacramento.

Electricity in 2001
California electricity grid operators ordered statewide rolling power blackouts to ease power shortages.

Power grid.

Power grid.

DreamWorks.

DreamWorks.

Philanthropy in 2002
David Geffen, co-founder of DreamWorks, donated $200 million to the UCLA School of Medicine. This was the largest donation to a medical school in the U.S.

Sports in 2009
Manny Ramirez, Los Angeles Dodger’s star outfielder, was suspended by Major League Baseball for 50 games for using HCG, a banned drug.

Manny Ramirez.

Manny Ramirez.

University of California.

University of California.

Education in 2009
University of California regents voted 17-4 to raise tuition by 9.3%, the 6th increase in 7 years.

 

 

Furia in 2009 
John Furia Jr., prolific screen and television writer, died at age 79 in Los Angeles. His work included popular TV series, like “The Twilight Zone” (1959-1964), “Bonanza” (1959-1973), “Hawaii Five-O” (1968-1980) and “The Waltons” (1971-1981).

Dan Benavides.

Dan Benavides.

Accidents in 2010
Dan Benavides, a 39-year-old CHP officer, was killed when his patrol plane went down near Highway 78 in Imperial County.

May 8

Estanislao Rebellion in 1829
Mexican soldiers battled hundreds of Cosumnes warriors who fled Bay Area missions. The Indians, lead by a man called Estasnislao in the greatest uprising of the mission period, had built a natural fortification in a bend of today’s Stanislaus River and repeatedly fought off the soldiers.  

Stanislaus River.

Stanislaus River.

Carrying hides to a longboat. Illustration from Two Years Before the Mast (1911)

Carrying hides to a longboat. Illustration from Two Years Before the Mast (1911)

Dana in 1836
Richard Henry Dana sailed from San Diego, returning to Boston. He dropped out of Harvard University and shipped out to California to improve his health. His adventures formed the basis for Two Years Before the Mast (1840), an eyewitness account of a sailor’s life, rancho culture and the hide and tallow trade.

 

 

 

Transportation in 1941
The last original Market Street Railway, Cable Car #133, was scrapped because of a lack of storage space.

Market Street cable car 133 waiting to be towed to the scrapper. Courtesy Waynee Miller Collection.

Market Street cable car 133 waiting to be towed to the scrapper. Courtesy Waynee Miller Collection.

Japanese American Internment in 1942
Marysville Assembly Center opened, built on a former migrant worker’s camp. It was part of the forced detention of approximately 110,000 Californians of Japanese ancestry during World War II. Assembly centers were used to securely move people to the ten internment prisons.

Marysville Assembly Center.

Marysville Assembly Center.

Jim "Catfish" Hunter.

Jim “Catfish” Hunter.

Sports in 1968 
Jim “Catfish” Hunter, Oakland A’s pitcher, threw a perfect game to beat the Minnesota Twins, 4-0.

Sports in 1970 
The New York Knicks beat the Los Angeles Lakers for the NBA championship,113-99. It was the ninth consecutive NBA championship series with a team from California, all of which were lost. 

Amusement Parks in 1976 
Revolution, the first steel roller coaster with a vertical loop, opened at Six Flags Magic Mountain in Valencia. It appears in “Rollercoaster” (1977), “Kiss Meets the Phantom of the Park” (1978) and “National Lampoon’s Vacation” (1983).

Business in 2013       
Electric car maker Coda Holdings Inc. of Los Angeles filed for bankruptcy after selling just 100 cars.

Coda automobile.

Coda automobile.

 

 

May 9

Transportation in 1882  
Telegraph Hill Railroad Company was organized  to carry people up Telegraph Hill to the Pioneer Park Observatory.

Pioneer Park Observatory.

Pioneer Park Observatory.

Race Relations in 1909  
The anti-Japanese Laundry League took steps at convention in San Francisco to boycott all Japanese enterprises on the Pacific Coast.

Anti-Japanese Laundry League (1909).

Anti-Japanese Laundry League (1909).

Saints Peter and Paul’s Catholic Church.

Saints Peter and Paul’s Catholic Church.

Crime in 1926  
A bomb exploded in front of the main entrance of Saints Peter and Paul’s Catholic Church in San Francisco. It was targeted by anti-Catholic anarchists, who made five bomb attacks against the building in a year.

Labor in 1934  
The West Coast Longshoreman’s Strike began. The longshoremen’s labor union shut down seaports in Washington, Oregon and California for three months, demanding a 6-hour workday and a hiring hall to replace the company run Blue Book Union on the waterfront. On July 5th, people watching from Rincon Hill in San Francisco saw police shoot tear gas canisters into the crowd then mounted police charged. It became known as “Bloody Thursday.”

Bloody Thursday (1934). Courtesy San Francisco Public Library.

Bloody Thursday (1934). Courtesy San Francisco Public Library.

Movies in 1958  
Alfred Hitchcock’s “Vertigo,” filmed in Northern California, premiered in San Francisco. 

Music in 1977  
Pink Floyd opened for two nights at the Oakland Coliseum, following massive sales of “Dark Side Of The Moon” (1973) and “Wish You Were Here” (1975).

Norco Bank Robbery (1980). Courtesy Riverside Sheriffs' Association.

Norco Bank Robbery (1980). Courtesy Riverside Sheriffs’ Association.

Crime in 1980  
Armed robbers held up a Security Pacific bank in Norco. That lead to a shoot-out and one of the largest pursuits in California history. Two gunmen and one police officer were killed and 33 police and civilian vehicles destroyed in the chase.

Embarcadero fire (1984).

Embarcadero fire (1984).

Fires in 1984  
A 5-alarm fire engulfed Piers 30 and 32 along the San Francisco Embarcadero. Damages were estimated at $2.5 million.

Sports in 1997  
San Diego Padres retired #35 worn by pitcher Randy Jones, nicknamed “Junkman.” He was  inducted into the San Diego Hall of Champions and Breitbard Hall of Fame honoring San Diego’s finest athletes.

California Environmental Protection Agency.

California Environmental Protection Agency.

Environment in 1997 
The California Environmental Protection Agency issued a report linking lung cancer to diesel exhaust fumes.

Crime in 2013  
Pamela Marie Devitt, age 63, was fatally mauled by a pack of pit bulls while walking near her home near Palmdale. Alex Jackson, age 29, owner of the dogs, was charged with murder. The dogs guarded his pot-growing operation. Jackson was sentenced to 15 years to life. 

May 10

Ranchos in 1837 
Rancho Punta de la Concepción was deeded. The Mexican land grant covering 24,992 acres in today’s Santa Barbara County belonged to Mission La Purísima Concepción. The rancho stretched along the coast from Point Arguello south to Cojo Creek, east of Point Conception.

Rancho diseno

Rancho diseno

Nero, a Donner Party dog.

Nero, a Donner Party dog.

Overland Trail in 1846 
The Donner and Reed wagons reached Independence, Missouri. They spent the next two days preparing for the journey. They would get  trapped by snow in the Sierra Nevada and nearly half of them would die.

Transportation in 1869 
The Golden Spike Ceremony completed the Transcontinental Railroad. Leland Stanford drove the spike that linked the Central Pacific and Union Pacific railroads at Promontory Summit, Utah Territory. Construction began on January 8, 1863.

The Last Spike (1881). Painting by Thomas Hill.

The Last Spike (1881). Painting by Thomas Hill.

Kientpoos, also known as Captain Jack

Kientpoos, also known as Captain Jack

Modoc War in 1873 
Modoc warriors attacked an Army encampment at Dry Lake. It was the first victory for the Army and began to divide the Modocs. One group surrendered to the Army and agreed to help capture their leader, Captain Jack.

 

Rancherias in 1909 
Sherwood Valley Rancheria was established in Mendocino County. It is home to Pomo people, whose land extends approximately from Highway 101, through redwood forests to the coast. The tribe owns Sherwood Valley Rancheria Casino and Creekside Cafe, formerly called the Black Bart Casino.

Sherwood Valley Rancheria Casino logo.

Sherwood Valley Rancheria Casino logo.

Charles Lindbergh and "The Spirit of St. Louis."

Charles Lindbergh and “The Spirit of St. Louis.”

Flight in 1927 
Charles Lindbergh, pilot, picked up “The Spirit of St. Louis” in San Diego and flew to St. Louis, then to New York navigating with railroad maps.

Japanese American Internment in 1942 
The Stockton Assembly Center opened. Built on the San Joaquin County Fairgrounds, it played a role in the forced detention of approximately 110,000 Californians of Japanese ancestry during World War II. Assembly centers were used to securely move people to ten internment prisons.

Family in front of barracks, May 19, 1942, Stockton Assembly Center, California. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration. Photograph by Dorothea Lange.

Family in front of barracks, May 19, 1942, Stockton Assembly Center, California. Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration. Photograph by Dorothea Lange.

Betsy Rawls (1953).

Betsy Rawls (1953).

Sports in 1953  
Betsy Rawls won the Ladies Professional Golf Association tournament in Sacramento. She won eight major championship, 55 LPGA tour events and is a member of the World Golf Hall of Fame.

 

Television in 1956 
KFSN-TV channel 30 in Fresno began broadcasting. The station is Fresno’s third-oldest TV station. Today it is part of the Disney-ABC Television Group and produces the shows “Motion” and “My Family Recipe Rocks” for the Live Well Network.

My Family Recipe Rocks.

My Family Recipe Rocks.

Harmonic stack uncertainty.

Harmonic stack uncertainty.

Science in 1997       
U.C. Berkeley physicists first documented the sound from superfluid helium atoms oscillating between overlapping quantum states, particle waves moving like like overlapping ripples in a pool.

Stevens in 2000        
Craig Stevens, star of the TV series “Peter Gunn” (1958-1961), died in Los Angeles at age 81.

Sports in 2002  
The Anaheim Angels crushed the Chicago White Sox, 19-0. This put them in company with just three other teams who beat opponents by 19 or more runs.

Guest in 2006        
Val Guest, British movie director, died in Palm Springs at age 94. He is best known for his horror and science fiction movies for Hammer Film Productions over 14 years. 

Fires in 2007 
The Island Fire broke out on Catalina Island. It burned 4,750 acres of interior chaparral then threatened Avalon, but only one residence and six commercial structures were destroyed.

The Island Fire (2007).

The Island Fire (2007).

Crime in 2007      
A federal jury in Santa Ana convicted Chi Mak, Chinese-born engineer, of spying for the Chinese government. He was sentenced to 24 1/2 years in federal prison.

Chi Mak.

Chi Mak.

San Jose State University.

San Jose State University.

Crime in 2011    
Three people were killed in a burst of gunfire at parking garage, an apparent double murder-suicide. They were the first shooting deaths in San Jose State University history.

Transportation in 2012       
BART, Bay Area Rapid Transit, directors awarded an $896.3 million contract to Bombardier to build 410 rail cars.

BART map.

BART map.

May 11

Architecture in 1850  
Work began on the first brick building in San Francisco following the recent fire that burned much of the city built of wood. The Naglee Building stood at corner of Montgomery and Merchant streets.

San Francisco fires (1849 - 1851)

San Francisco fires (1849 – 1851)

Government in 1854 
Amador County was established in the Sierra Nevada. It is “The Heart of the Mother Lode” in Gold Rush country. The county was split into Amador, Calaveras and El Dorado counties and part of its territory was also given to Alpine County.

Amador County.

Amador County.

Business in 1880        
A U.S. Marshal and deputies faced a group of San Joaquin Valley farmers over a land dispute with the Southern Pacific Railroad. They had developed an irrigation system that turned the land into an agricultural area. The Railroad claimed the land and won a suit to that effect. Seven men were killed in what became known as the Battle of Mussel Slough. 

Frederick Keller, "The Ogre of Mussel Slough" The Wasp, March 12, 1882.

Frederick Keller, “The Ogre of Mussel Slough” The Wasp, March 12, 1882.

Postcard from the Shriners' Convention in Los Angeles (1907).

Postcard from the Shriners’ Convention in Los Angeles (1907).

Accidents in 1907 
Thirty-two Shriners were killed when their chartered train derailed in Lompoc. They came from around the U.S. to a conference in Los Angeles and were on their way to San Francisco.

Water in 1908 
The Hetch Hetchy Dam was approved. The 1906 San Francisco Earthquake and Fire made it clear that the city needed a large, reliable source of water.  Hetch Hetchy Valley, northwestern of Yosemite, drained by the Tuolumne River, was selected for development.

Study for The Hetch Hetchy by Albert Bierstadt. Collection Mr. and Mrs. E.E. White, Mamaroneck, New York.

Study for The Hetch Hetchy by Albert Bierstadt. Collection Mr. and Mrs. E.E. White, Mamaroneck, New York.

Oscars.

Oscars.

Movies in 1927  
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences met for the first time. At its first banquet, 230 film industry professionals joined the Academy. Membership cost $100. They awarded an honorary membership to Thomas Edison.

 

Nightclubs in 1939        
The Top of the Mark Nightclub opened at the top of the Mark Hopkins Hotel on Nob Hill. It’s at the highest point of downtown San Francisco.

Rickets in 1948    
Edward “Doc” Ricketts, marine biologist and friend of John Steinbeck, died in Monterey at age 51. He was struck by a train when his car stalled on railroad tracks. He is best known for Between Pacific Tides (1939), a pioneering study of intertidal ecology, 

Sports in 1963 
Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher, threw his second no-hitter to beat the San Francisco Giants, 8-0. He fanned Willie Mays, Willie McCovey and Orlando Cepeda. Kaufax pitched four no-hitters in his career. 

Sandy Koufax. Topps Baseball Card (1964).

Sandy Koufax. Topps Baseball Card (1964).

Willie Mays, 1966

Willie Mays, 1966

Sports in 1972 
The San Francisco Giants traded Willie Mays to the New York Mets for pitcher Charlie Williams and cash.

Crime in 1996        
Daniel Fraembs, Orange County sheriff’s deputy, was shot and killed on South Humane Way.  

Education in 2007        
California high school graduation rates fell to 67%, a 10-year low, according to a basic skills exit exam given for the first time.

Crime in 2008        
Patricia Barrales’s mother found her body in a closet buried under toys in a toy chest. The 25-year-old had been stabbed 68 times. Honorio Pantaleon, age 32, was later convicted of the murder of the mother of his two children.

Chevron.

Chevron.

Business in 2010        
Richmond city officials signed an agreement with Chevron Corp., which operates the Richmond refinery, to pay the city $114 million over 15 years.

Crime in 2011        
Samuel Kioskli, a 64-year-old  former San Francisco ATM serviceman, was arrested during a routine traffic stop in Phoenix, Arizona. He stole about 200,000 from six bank branches by replacing cash with counterfeit $20 bills.

Young in 2011        
Snooky Young, legendary big band trumpeter, died in Newport Beach at age 92. He was a master of the plunger mute, with which he was able to create wide ranging sounds.

Clyde Thompson Jr.

Clyde Thompson Jr.

Crime in 2012      
Clyde Thompson Jr., 51-year-old president of the local Black Sabbath Motorcycle chapter, was killed in a drive-by shooting in San Diego.

May 12

Ranchos in 1844 
Rancho Paso de Robles was deeded. The name means “Pass of the Oaks.” The Mexican land grant, covering 25,993 acres in today’s San Luis Obispo County, included the present day Paso Robles and Templeton.

Sam Brannon. By Gaylynn Ribeira.

Sam Brannon. By Gaylynn Ribeira.

Gold Rush in 1848 
Sam Brannan sparked gold fever in San Francisco by waving a bottle of gold dust and shouting “Gold! Gold! Gold from the American River!” He had been paid in gold for goods he sold in his store at Sutter’s Fort.

 

Beverly Hills in 1912 
Beverly Hills Hotel opened. It was popular with the rich and famous over many years. Elizabeth Taylor’s father had an art gallery in the hotel. Howard Hughes lived there on-and-off for 30 years. The hotel exterior was featured on the album cover of the Eagles’ “Hotel California” (1976).

Hotel California, The Eagles (1976).

Hotel California, The Eagles (1976).

Longs Drugs.

Longs Drugs.

Business in 1928         
Joe and Tom Longs, brothers, opened their first store in Oakland. They bought Bill’s Drugs, a 20 store chain in northern California, in 1993. Then CVS Caremark bought Longs Drugs for $2.9 billion in 2008.

 

Gold in 1937     
Some 1,000 tons of gold were moved from the old San Francisco Mint to the new one. The old one once held a third of the nation’s gold supply. 

Water in 1964      
The reverse osmosis process for turning seawater and waste-water into potable stuff was patented in San Diego.

California water system.

California water system.

Hawk in 1968 
Anthony Frank “Tony” Hawk was born in Carlsbad. He is a skateboard pioneer who licensed video games. Hawk won the National Skateboard Association world championship 12 consecutive times. Six Flags opened Tony Hawk’s Big Spin rides at three parks.

Freddy Markham and the Gold Rush.

Freddy Markham and the Gold Rush.

Sports in 1986 
“Fast” Fred Markham became the first person to pedal 65 miles per hour. He did it unaided by the wind on a level course at Big Sand Flat. His racer, the Gold Rush, is housed at the Smithsonian Institution. 

Accidents in 1989 
Four people died in a train crash in San Bernardino. Then an underground gas pipeline damaged during the crash cleanup exploded, killing two more people a week later. The Southern Pacific train had lost control, plowed into a residential area and burst the pipeline where the derailment happened, covering the neighborhood with vapor that burst into a large fire that burned for nearly seven hours.

San Bernardino train disaster (1989).

San Bernardino train disaster (1989).

Reed in 1992        
Robert Reed, stage, film and television actor and television director, died in Pasadena at age 59. He was best known for his role in “The Brady Bunch” (1969-1974). 

Fires in 2000        
The Los Alamos fire burned 191 housing structures and 30,000 acres.

Great Seal of California.

Great Seal of California.

Government in 2006         
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger proposed a $131 billion budget. The plan used most of the $7.5-billion windfall to boost school spending after years of cutbacks and to pay off a significant chunk of the state’s debt.

Business in 2008        
Powerset, a San Francisco Internet company founded in 2005, released a search engine that could find targeted answers to user questions, as opposed to keyword based search. Microsoft bought Powerset for some $100 million.

Powerset.

Powerset.

Great Seal of California.

Great Seal of California.

Government in 2012        
Governor Jerry Brown said the state budget deficit was a projected $16 billion, much larger than predicted months earlier. He said that if voters failed to pass tax increases, school and public safety budgets would be severely cut.

Music in 2013     
BottleRock, a 4-day music festival, closed in Napa. Ticket prices started at $299 for a 3-day pass. 

May 13

Native Americans at Mission Dolores drawn by Louis Choris (1816).

Native Americans at Mission Dolores drawn by Louis Choris (1816).

Exploration in 1817 
Lt. Don Luis Arguello and Padre Narciso Durán explored the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. They were searching for Indians to baptize and bring to Mission Dolores. Their expedition lasted two weeks but they returned largely empty-handed. 

 

Rancho diseno

Rancho diseno

Ranchos in 1833 
Rancho Punta de Pinos was deeded. Its name means “Point of the Pines.” The 2,667-acre Mexican land grant in today’s Monterey County extended along the coast from near Pacific Grove south to Pescadero.

Mexican American War in 1846 
The U.S. declared war on Mexico. U.S. forces occupied Alta California and New Mexico then invaded Mexico. Combat lasted to the fall of 1847. In the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Mexico surrendered those territories to the United States.

Cities in 1850 
Eureka was incorporated. The name means “I found it!” and is on the state seal. Humboldt County’s capital is the largest city between San Francisco and Portland, Oregon and is on the second largest bay in the state.

Eureka, California (1902).

Eureka, California (1902).

Cities in 1854 
Placerville was incorporated. The El Dorado County town was once known as Dry Diggings and Hangtown. During the Gold Rush it was a hub for the Mother Lode region’s mining operations. Today it is part of the Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville metropolitan area.

Placerville (1866).

Placerville (1866).

Alma de Bretteville Spreckels.

Alma de Bretteville Spreckels.

Monuments in 1903        
President Theodore Roosevelt dedicated the Dewey Memorial in San Francisco’s Union Square. The 12-foot statue of Victory atop an 83-foot column was modeled on beautiful Alma de Bretteville Spreckels.

 

 

Flight in 1912        
Roy Francis, pilot, and Phil Rader, artist, flew over San Francisco for 36 minutes. They performed a series of airship maneuvers for the Army at the Presidio. 

Roy Francis, pilot. Ernest Stockton, passenger.

Roy Francis, pilot. Ernest Stockton, passenger.

Frank Cieciorka, fist woodcut.

Frank Cieciorka, fist woodcut.

Civil rights in 1960 
Bill Mandel was brought before a House on Unamerican Activities Committee in San Francisco to explain his broadcasts at KPFA radio and KQED TV about the press in the Soviet Union. KQED canceled him but he kept broadcasting on KPFA. Sixty-four people were arrested at a protest. Police used fire hoses. Frank Cieciorka was inspired to create his woodcut fist that became an icon of the 1960’s. 

Civil rights in 1960
The Free Speech Movement was born at U.C. Berkeley. When hundreds of students staged a political protest, demanding the university permit political activities on campus and recognize students’ rights to free speech and academic freedom, 31 were arrested.

Free Speech at UC Berkeley.

Free Speech at U.C. Berkeley.

Cooper in 1961 
Gary Cooper, legendary actor, died in Los Angeles at age 60. He played leading roles in 84 feature films, famouly in  “High Noon” (1952) and other Westerns. 

Mother's Day Massacre (1973).

Mother’s Day Massacre (1973).

Tennis in 1973 
Bobby Riggs beat Margaret Court in a tennis match called the “Mother’s Day Massacre.” Promoted as a battle of the sexes in Ramona, Riggs came from retirement to challenge one of the world’s great female players.

 

 

 

Business in 1991 
Apple released Macintosh System 7.0.

Mac OS 7.6.1.

Mac OS 7.6.1.

SpaceShipOne. Photograph by D Ramey Logan.

SpaceShipOne. Photograph by D Ramey Logan.

Flight in 2004 
SpaceShipOne, a rocket built by Mojave Aerospace Ventures, climbed to 211,400 feet . It become the first privately funded vehicle to reach the edge of space.

Whales in 2007 
A mother humpback whale and her calf were spotted swimming up the Sacramento River. On May 29 they returned to San Francisco Bay and were spotted outside the Golden Gate the next day.

Humpback whale.

Humpback whale.

Karen Bass, Speaker of the Assembly.

Karen Bass, Speaker of the Assembly.

Government in 2008 
Assemblywoman Karen Bass , age 54, became the 67th speaker of the California Assembly and the first African American woman to hold that office.

Business in 2008 
Hewlett-Packard Co., headquartered in Palo Alto, announced purchase of Electronic Data Systems Corp. for $12.6 billion. That formed the second largest technology services provider behind IBM.

California State University.

California State University.

Education in 2009 
The California State University Board of Trustees voted 17-2 to adopt a 10% tuition increase at its 23 campuses. This was its 7th increase since 2002.

Science in 2009 
Deep Flight Super Falcon, a 2-person submarine, was unveiled at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. It scheduled to begin exploring Monterey Bay.

DeepFlight Super Falcon.

DeepFlight Super Falcon.

City of Los Angeles.

City of Los Angeles.

Government in 2010 
Los Angeles City Council voted to boycott Arizona businesses, making it the largest city to protest the state’s tough new law targeting illegal immigration.

Chew in 2010 
Ruth Chew, children’s fantasy author, died in Castro Valley at age 90. She published 30 children’s books including Trapped in Time (1986).

California State Parks.

California State Parks.

Government in 2011 
California state parks officials said 70 state parks would close starting in September as a result of state budget cuts.