California History Timeline, June 3 to June 10

June 3

Missions in 1770
Father Junipero Serra dedicated Mission San Carlos de Monterey at Carmel. It was first established at the presidio in Monterey but moved in 1771 to the Carmel Valley on a hillside, “two gunshots” from the ocean.

Ranchos in 1846
Rancho Palos Verdes was deeded. Today Palos Verdes is a wealthy Los Angeles suburb of approximately 41,643 residents.

Rancho diseno

Rancho diseno

Colton Hall, site of the constitutional convention

Colton Hall, site of the constitutional convention

Government in 1849
Brevet Brigadier-General Bennet Riley, Military Governor of California, ordered “the formation of a State constitution or a plan for a territorial government.”

Business in 1878
Mammoth Mining Company was organized to mine Mineral Hill, which caused a brief Mono County gold rush. Fifteen hundred people moved to Mammoth City that year. But the company shut down in 1880 and population declined to less than 10. Today it is a hiking and skiing community.

mammoth ski runs.

Mammoth ski runs.

Transportation in 1913
San Francisco retired the last horse-drawn streetcar, more than 20 years after the introduction of electric streetcars.

An editorial cartoon from the 04-June-1913 San Francisco Call, Mr Public apparently operates a Sutter Street electric car to the Ferry and bids G-o-o-d Night to the horse car as it makes its way to the junk pile.

An editorial cartoon from the 04-June-1913 San Francisco Call, Mr Public apparently operates a Sutter Street electric car to the Ferry and bids G-o-o-d Night to the horse car as it makes its way to the junk pile.

Race relations in 1943
U.S. Navy sailors and Marines battled Latino youths in what became the Zoot Suit Riots in Los Angeles.

Zoot suit riot (1943).

Zoot suit riot (1943).

Giannini in 1949
Amadeo Peter Giannini, founder of the Bank of America, died in San Mateo at age 79. Among other businesses, he helped grow the motion picture and wine industries in California.

Amadeo Peter Giannini.

Amadeo Peter Giannini.

Government in 1956
Santa Cruz banned Rock and Roll. City authorities announced a total ban on rock and roll at public gatherings, calling the music “Detrimental to both the health and morals of our youth and community.”

Rock and roll protest in Santa Cruz (1956).

Rock and roll protest in Santa Cruz (1956).

california street cable cars looking towards nob hill, san francisco

california street cable cars looking towards nob hill, san francisco

Tranportation in 1984
San Francisco’s California Street cable cars returned to service after nearly 20 months and $58.2 million in redesign and construction costs.

Accidents in 2001
Daniel Katz, age 24, disappeared while flying over San Bernardino National Forest. This began one of the most extensive and high-tech searches in the area’s history. His wrecked rented plane was found on a steep mountainside north of Rancho Cucamonga in 2008.

Lew Wasserman.

Lew Wasserman.

Wasserman in 2002
Lew Wasserman, talent agent and movie executive, died in Beverly Hills at age 89. He was one of the most powerful men in Hollywood history.

Crime in 2007
Paris Hilton attended the MTV Movie Awards then reported to jail. She was to serve a 45-day sentence for a probation violation in an alcohol-related reckless driving case. Hilton was released after three days but a Los Angeles County judge ordered her back to jail.

Paris Hilton. Photo by Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images (2014).

Paris Hilton. Photo by Imeh Akpanudosen/Getty Images (2014).

Maggie and David Bromige (2007).

Maggie and David Bromige (2007).

Bromige in 2009
David Bromige, poet and professor, died in Sebastopol at age 75. He was Sonoma County’s second poet laureate (2001-2003).

 

Arness in 2011
James Arness, actor, died in Los Angeles at age 88. He played in some 50 films and television shows, including “Gunsmoke” (1955-1975), one of the longest running series.

Sean Parker's wedding (2014).

Sean Parker’s wedding (2014).

Payments in 2013
California Coastal Commission reached a $2.5 million settlement with Sean Parker, Napster co-founder, who spent $10 million to build a large movie-set-like wedding site in an ecologically sensitive area of Big Sur without proper permits.

June 4

Transportation in 1849
The USS Panama anchored in San Francisco Bay. There were already about 200 deserted ships in the harbor because their crews had abandoned them for the gold fields.

Abandoned ships in San Francisco (1849)

Abandoned ships in San Francisco (1849)

Transportation in 1849
Eighteen sailors from the USS Ohio abandoned their ship to go to the gold diggings.

Pacific Mail Steamship Co. advertisement.

Pacific Mail Steamship Co. advertisement.

Transportation in 1849
The Pacific Mail Steamship Co.’s ships – California, Oregon, and Panama – established a regular round trip schedule ferrying gold seekers and mail between Panama and San Francisco.

Business in 1863
One man was killed and another died of wounds a few days later in a shootout over eggs on the Farallon Islands. Eggs, valuable in San Francisco, were free for gathering on the islands off the coast. David Batchelder and 27 armed men sailed there to harvest them, challenging the Egg Co. for the business. 

Post offices in 1867
The Pleasanton post office opened. It should have been Pleasonton but a clerical error changed the spelling.

Pleasanton.

Pleasanton.

Transportation in 1876
The Transcontinental Express train arrived in San Francisco, 83 hours and 39 minutes after leaving New York City.

The Transcontinental Express (1876).

The Transcontinental Express (1876).

Capitol Records.

Capitol Records.

Business in 1942
Capitol Records opened in Los Angeles, founded by songwriter Johnny Mercer. It was first West Coast-based label in the U.S. It began the practice of giving free records to radio DJs to promote air play. It signed The Beach Boys in the early 1960s.

 

 

Race relations in 1943
Some 200 sailors formed a caravan of about twenty cars and taxis to hunt Mexican American youth dressed in zoot-suits. They traveled through downtown Los Angeles and the eastside of the city, out to the suburbs as far as Belvedere Gardens.

Sports in 1958
Hank Sauer and B. Schmidt, San Francisco Giants, became the second players in MLB history to hit consecutive pinch home runs.

Sports in 1964 
Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles Dodger, pitched his third no-hitter to beat the Philadelphia Phillies, 3-0.

Sandy Koufax. Topps Baseball Card (1964).

Sandy Koufax. Topps Baseball Card (1964).

Mike Ivie (1970).

Mike Ivie (1970).

Sports in 1970 
The San Diego Padres picked Mike Ivie as their first overall draft choice. He debuted at age 18 and became one of only five MLB players to hit two pinch-hit grand slams in the same season.

Sports in 1971 
In the longest game in their history, the Oakland A’s beat the Washington Senators in 21 innings, 5-3.

Politics in 1972
Angela Davis, political activist, professor and author, was acquitted of killing a white guard. She was arrested, charged, tried and acquitted of conspiracy in the armed take-over of a Marin County courtroom, in which four persons died in 1970.

Labor in 1975
California Governor Jerry Brown signed the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act into law. It was the first law in the U.S. that gave collective bargaining rights to farm workers.

Protests in 1989
Thousands of people gathered in front of the Chinese Consulate in San Francisco to protest the slaughter of students and other citizens at Tiananmen Square in Beijing. 

Ramon Martinez.

Ramon Martinez.

Sports in 1990
Ramon Martinez, Los Angeles Dodgers, struck out 18 Atlanta Braves, 6-0. That tied Sandy Kofax’s club record.

Sports in 1992 
San Jose voters rejected the Giants plan to build a new stadium south of San Francisco.

Lake Tahoe.

Lake Tahoe.

Government in 1999
Senators Diane Feinstein of California and Harry Reid of Nevada announced the Lake Tahoe Restoration Act. It authorized $300 million over 10 years to restore the lake’s water.

Business in 2001
Hewlett-Packard, in Palo Alto, agreed to pay $400 million to Pitney Bowes to settle a 6-year-old patent dispute over printer technology.

Hewlett-Packard.

Hewlett-Packard.

Palm Inc.

Palm Inc.

Business in 2003
Palm Inc., in Sunnyvale, said it would buy rival Handspring, headquartered in Mountain View, in a stock deal valued at $195 million.

Brown in 2003
Delmar Brown, legendary fly fisherman, died in Watsonville at age 84. He practically invented fly fishing, was known for the Del Brown Crab Fly and catching a 127-pound tarpon using 8-pound test line.

Del Brown Crab Permit, Photo by RiverBum.com.

Del Brown Crab Permit, Photo by RiverBum.com.

Oracle logo.

Oracle logo.

Business in 2005
Larry Ellison, head of Oracle Corp. in Redwood City, reportedly planned a joint venture with Harvard University to create a database and journal to track improvements in world health with a $115 million grant. But he withdrew the donation to protest the resignation of Harvard President Lawrence Summers in 2006.

Vang Pao, former Laotian general.

Vang Pao, former Laotian general.

Crime in 2007
Nine Hmong leaders, a former Laotian military general, and a former California National Guard officer were arrested for their alleged plot to overthrow the communist government of Laos. They were charged with violating the US federal Neutrality Act. In 2009 federal prosecutors in Sacramento dismissed charges against Vang Pao, the former Laotian general.

Drought.

Drought.

Government in 2008
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a statewide drought after two years of below-average rainfall, low snowmelt runoff and a court-ordered restriction on water transfers.

Business in 2008
Google, in Mountain View, announced leasing 42 acres at Moffet Field, a former naval air station nearby. The annual rent was initially $3.7 million.

Google.

Google.

Countrywide Financial Corp.

Countrywide Financial Corp.

Crime in 2009
Federal officials charged Angelo Mozilo with civil fraud and illegal insider trading. He built Countrywide Financial Corp., in Calabasas, into a giant high-risk mortgage company. He was accused of deceiving shareholders and profiting on confidential information.

UCLA basketball coach John Wooden, center, talks to his UCLA team.

UCLA basketball coach John Wooden, center, talks to his UCLA team.

Wooden in 2010
John Wooden, college basketball’s legendary coach, died in Los Angeles at age 99. The “Wizard of Westwood” built one of the greatest dynasties in all of sports at UCLA and was one of the most revered coaches ever.

June 5

Books in 1848 
John C. Fremont submitted his Geographical Memoir to the U.S. Senate. He named the entrance to San Francisco Bay “Chrysopylae,” meaning Golden Gate in Greek to honor the ancient Golden Horn of Constantinople.

The golden gate from Telegraph Hill in San Francisco in 1872. An engraving from a study by James D. Smillie, engraved by E. P. Brandard and published in Picturesque America, D. Appleton & Company, New York, New York 1872.

The golden gate from Telegraph Hill in San Francisco in 1872. An engraving from a study by James D. Smillie, engraved by E. P. Brandard and published in Picturesque America, D. Appleton & Company, New York, New York 1872.

San Juan Capistrano (1910).

San Juan Capistrano (1910).

Post offices in 1867
San Juan Capistrano post office opened. By 1877 San Juan Capistrano had a school, telegraph office, post office, two stores, hotel, four saloons and forty to fifty homes, mostly of adobe.

Business in 1875
Pacific Stock Exchange formally opened in San Francisco. It organized chaotic trading in Comstock Lode silver mines. 

Bay Bridge History. worker on west span tower 2 (1936).

Bay Bridge History. worker on west span tower 2 (1936).

Accidents in 1936
George Zink, 40-year-old San Francisco Bay Bridge worker, fell to his death. He was the 22nd man killed on the transbay bridge construction.

Race relations in 1943
Zoot Suit Riots in Los Angeles. Racial violence broke out for days between Anglo American sailors and Marines stationed in the city and Latino youths, recognizable by zoot suits they wore.

Zoot suit riot (1943).

Zoot suit riot (1943).

Government in 1959
Forty San Francisco Bay Area teachers, accused of being Communists, were subpoenaed by the House Un-American Activities Committee. The American Civil Liberties Union said it would do everything possible to block the hearings.

House Committee on Un-American Activities.

House Committee on Un-American Activities.

Crime in 1968 
Robert F. Kennedy, U.S. presidential candidate, was shot at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, by Sirhan Sirhan, a Palestinian. Kennedy died the next day.

Compton mayor Doris Davis.

Compton mayor Doris Davis.

Government in 1973
Doris Davis was elected mayor of Compton. She became the first African-American woman to govern a city in a major metropolitan area.

Sports in 1977 
The Los Angeles Dodgers retired Walt Alston’s #24. He managed the Brooklyn-then-Los Angeles Dodgers between 1954 and 1976. He was known as “The Quiet Man.”

Walt Alston, Topps #24 back (1969).

Walt Alston, Topps #24 back (1969).

Crime in 1997
Cremated remains of some 2,000 people were found in a Discovery Bay storage facility. They were kept by a flying service that was supposed to dispose of the remains at sea or over the Sierras.

Pride Rainbow Flag.

Pride Rainbow Flag.

Public health in 1981
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that five people in Los Angeles had a rare form of pneumonia seen only in patients with weakened immune systems. Those turned out to be the first recognized cases of AIDS.

Torme in 1999
Mel Torme, Jazz and pop singer, died in Los Angeles at age 73. Called the “Velvet Fog,” Torme was best known for standards.

Sports in 2002
Magic Johnson, a Los Angeles Lakers legend, was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Ramone in 2002
Dee Dee Ramone, founding member, songwriter and bassist for the Ramones, died in Hollywood at age 49. He struggled with drug addiction for much of his life.

Ronald Reagan.

Ronald Reagan.

Reagan in 2004
Ronald Reagan died in Bel-Aire. Actor and politician, he served as Governor of California (1967–1975) and President of the United States (1981–1989).

Crime in 2005
FBI agents in Lodi arrested Hamid Hayat, age 22, for training at an al Qaeda camp in Pakistan. He was sentenced to 24 years in prison for supporting terrorists by training with them in Pakistan.

U.N. World Environment Day.

U.N. World Environment Day.

Environment in 2005
Big city mayors from around the world signed urban environmental accords. That ended a 5-day U.N. World Environment conference in San Francisco.

Crime in 2009
Raymond Lee Oyler, a 38-year-old convicted arsonist, was sentenced to death for starting the Esperanza wildfire (2006). Five federal firefighters died defending a rural home from raging, wind-driven flames.

Esperanza Fire (2006).

Esperanza Fire (2006).

Forsman in 2009
Clyde Forsman, singer and accordion enthusiast known for his full body tattoos, died in San Francisco at age 94. He was a founding member of “Those Darn Accordions.”

Great Seal of California.

Great Seal of California.

Government in 2012
California voters approved Proposition 28. It reduced the time citizens can serve in the state Legislature from 14 years to 12, but allowed a member to serve the entire time in one house.

Crime in 2012
Aldo Joseph Baccala, age 71, of Sonoma County, was charged with 167 felony counts of grand theft, securities fraud and elder abuse after investigators uncovered his $20 million Ponzi scheme.

Aldo Joseph Baccala.

Aldo Joseph Baccala.

June 6

Levi Strauss & Co. logo

Levi Strauss & Co. logo

Business in 1850 
Levi Strauss made his first pair of sturdy pants for sale to gold miners. Today Levi Strauss & Co. is the world’s largest brand-name apparel manufacturer.

Accidents in 1853 
The Carrier Pigeon, a merchant sailing vessel from Boston, wrecked and sank when it struck a reef off Whale Point, later called Pigeon Point. That prompted the building of the Pigeon Point lighthouse in San Mateo County.

Pigeon Point lighthouse.

Pigeon Point lighthouse.

Inventions in 1871
Hannah G. Suplee and  John H. Mooney, of San Francisco, patented an Improvement in sewing machines.

Hannah G. Suplee and John H. Mooney, of San Francisco, patented an Improvement in sewing machines (1871).

Hannah G. Suplee and John H. Mooney, of San Francisco, patented an Improvement in sewing machines (1871).

Transformers (2007).

Transformers (2007).

Business in 1914
Three movie companies in Los Angeles and San Francisco merged to form the Paramount Picture Corp. Recent releases include “Mission: Impossible” (1996), “Transformers” (2007),  the Marvel Cinematic Universe series (2008–11) and Indiana Jones (1981–2008).

Movies in 1930
A talkie newsreel was shown at the Marion Davies and Embassy Theaters as well as motion-picture houses throughout Northern California and Nevada.

Howard Jarvis and Proposition 13 (1978).

Howard Jarvis and Proposition 13 (1978).

Government in 1978 
Passage of Proposition 13 cut California property taxes by 57%, beginning a downward trend in state budgets. Spending for California public schools, which during the 1960s ranked among the top nationally has fallen to 50th in 2014.

 

 

Haley in 1979
Jack Haley, stage, radio, and film actor and singer, died in Los Angeles at age 81. He is best known as the Tin Man in “The Wizard of Oz” (1939).

Johnny Rockets.

Johnny Rockets.

Business in 1986
Ronn Teitelbaum opened Johnny Rockets, a diner themed restaurant, on Melrose Ave. in Los Angeles. By 2000 it grew to 138 restaurants in 25 states.

 

Getz in 1991
Stan Getz, legendary tenor jazz saxophonist, died in Malibu at age 64. He was best known for popularizing bossa nova with a worldwide hit single “The Girl from Ipanema” (1964).

 

Sacramento Surge.

Sacramento Surge.

Sports in 1992
The Sacramento Surge defeated the Orlando Thunder, 21-1, in the World Bowl 2 of the World League of American Football played in Montreal, Canada. 

Public health in 1996
San Francisco became the first city in the nation to sue the tobacco industry. It sought an end to advertisements aimed at children and repayment of millions of public dollars spent to treat smoking-related illnesses.

Philip Morris.

Philip Morris.

Public health in 2001
A Los Angeles jury awarded more than $3 billion to Richard Boeken, a lifelong smoker. It decided Philip Morris was responsible for his lung cancer. The award was reduced to $50 million. Boeken died in 2002.

Business in 2004
Oracle, in Redwood City, issued a $5.1 billion hostile takeover bid for PeopleSoft, headquartered in Pleasanton, at $16 per share.

Business in 2005
Apple Corp., in Cupertino, confirmed plans to switch to microprocessors made by Intel Corp., headquartered in Santa Clara.

Business in 2005
PropLogis, the largest U.S. real estate investment trust, announced plans to buy developer Catellus Corp. for $4.9 billion. Both were headquartered in San Francisco.

Palm Inc.

Palm Inc.

Business in 2009
Palm Inc., in Sunnyvale, introduced the Pre smart phone. Apple, headquartered in Cupertino, accused the Pre of copying elements of the user interface. Two days later Apple unveiled an updated versions of its popular iPhone.

Business in 2011
Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple in Cupertino, unveiled a service called iCloud to store music, photos, documents, and electronic books and wirelessly transfer them between Apple devices. 

iCloud.

iCloud.

Golden State Warriors.

Golden State Warriors.

Sports in 2011
The Golden State Warriors, in Sacramento, hired Mark Jackson to be their new head coach. Jackson, a former NBA star and television sports commentator had never coached a professional basketball team.

Williams in 2013
Esther Williams, teenage swimming champion and Hollywood movie star, died in Beverly Hills at age 91. She appeared in “aqua musicals” in the 1940s and 1950s, featuring elaborate synchronized swimming and diving.

June 7

Lasuén in 1736
Padre Fermín Lasuén was born in Spain. He governed the California mission system three years longer than Junipero Serra and founded Mission Santa Barbara (1786),  La Purísima Concepción (1787), Santa Cruz (1791), Nuestra Señora de la Soledad (1791), San José (1797), San Juan Bautista (1797), San Miguel Arcángel (1797), San Fernando Rey de España (1797) and San Luis Rey de Francia (1798).

Santa Barbara Mission by Lloyd Harting (1901 - 1974)

Santa Barbara Mission by Lloyd Harting (1901 – 1974)

Overland trail in 1828
Jedediah Smith, on his second journey to California, led a party of people down the Klamath River. They were starving when Indians brought them food. Smith’s party turned north to Oregon where most were killed by Umpqua Indians. 

Market Street Railway 1860

Market Street Railway (1860)

Transportation in 1860
Workmen began laying track for the Market Street Railroad in San Francisco. It opened on July 4, 1860, as both a horse car and steam train line.

Organizations in 1875
The California Rifle and Pistol Association was founded. Today its members represent competitive and recreational shooters, hunters, youth, women, police, firearm experts and trainers and people who own guns to defend their families.

California Rifle and Pistol Association.

California Rifle and Pistol Association.

Public libraries in 1879
San Francisco Public Library opened. Andrew Hallidie, promoter of the cable cars, was a major public library advocate. A new Civic Center Library, which opened in 1996, was a setting for the film “City of Angels” (1998).

San Francisco Public Library.

San Francisco Public Library.

Inventions in 1887
Amelia Waterhouse of San Francisco patented a reversible broiler or toaster.

Amelia Waterhouse patented a reversible broiler & toaster (1887).

Amelia Waterhouse patented a reversible broiler & toaster (1887).

Movies in 1909 
Mary Pickford, “America’s Sweetheart,” made her screen debut at age 16 then made a film each week for the rest of the year. She later co-founded United Artists and was an original member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Harlow in 1937
Jean Harlow, legendary film actress and 1930s sex symbol, died in Los Angeles at age 26. She was known as the “Blond Bombshell” or the “Platinum Blonde” and popular for her “Laughing Vamp” characters.

Lux Radio Theater.

Lux Radio Theater.

Radio in 1955
Lux Radio Theater permanently signed off the air. The show launched in New York in 1934 then moved to Los Angeles in 1936 and featured radio adaptations of Broadway shows and popular films.

Radio in 1959 
KLX-AM in Oakland changed its call letters to KEWB. Today it’s KNEW-AM, a business talk-radio format.

Public health in 1967
Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic opened in San Francisco. It began with a $500 donation from All Saints Episcopal Church. The clinic started a nationwide free clinic movement. 

Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic.

Haight Ashbury Free Medical Clinic.

Moby Grape.

Moby Grape.

Crime in 1967
Three Moby Grape band members were arrested on Mt. Tamalpais for having sex with underage girls after a concert at the Avalon Ballroom in San Francisco. 

Theater in 1974
Steve Silver’s “Beach Blanket Babylon” premiered at the Savoy Tivoli in San Francisco. Its songs that poke fun at pop and political culture are performed by actors wearing enormous hats/wigs and gaudy costumes. Today it is the longest-running musical revue in the world. 

Henry Miller, Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Henry Miller, Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images.

Miller in 1980
Henry Miller, writer, died in Pacific Palisades at age 88. His Tropic of Cancer (1934), Black Spring (1936), Tropic of Capricorn (1939) and The Rosy Crucifixion trilogy (1949–59), were banned in the U.S. until 1961.

Sports in 1982
Steve Garvey, Los Angeles Dodgers, became the fifth player to play in 1,000 consecutive games. Overall with the Dodgers, he played in 1,727 games for 14 seasons and hit .301 with 211 homers and 992 RBI.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Science in 1999
Scientists at U.C. Berkeley’s Lawrence Livermore Labs reportedly created elements 118 and 116 from krypton-86 and Lead-208. But in 2002 Victor Ninov was accused of faking the data. False data by Ninov was also reported on elements 110 and 112 from experiments in 1994 and 1996.

Bartonella Rochilame.

Bartonella Rochilame.

Science in 2007
U.C. San Francisco scientists reportedly identified a new species of bacteria, Bartonella Rochalimae. An American tourist was sickened by it after spending weeks trekking in Peru. 

Business in 2010
Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple in Cupertino, unveiled the iPhone 4. Apple sold some 72 million iPhones in fiscal year 2011.. 

Crime in 2013
Richard Ramirez, the 53-year-old known as the “Night Stalker” killer, was executed at San Quentin Prison in Marin County. He had been on death row or nearly 28 years.

Richard Ramirez (1985).

Richard Ramirez (1985).

June 8

Transportation in 1889
Los Angeles Cable Railway, the city’s third cable car system begin service. It  included two lines that snaked through much of the city. The first featured a viaduct over the Los Angeles River and Southern Pacific railyard, stretching from East Los Angeles (now Lincoln Heights) to Jefferson and Grand. The other extended between Westlake (now MacArthur) Park and Boyle Heights.

Los Angeles Cable Railway.

Los Angeles Cable Railway.

XB-70 Valkyrie (1966).

XB-70 Valkyrie (1966).

Accidents in 1966 
A F-104 Starfighter collided with a XB-70 Valkyrie prototype near Edwards Air Force Base. Both planes were destroyed. The Valkyrie was designed to be a high-altitude Mach 3, nuclear-armed deep-penetration strategic bomber for the U.S. Air Force Strategic Air Command.

Sports in 1968
Don Drysdale, Los Angeles Dodgers, pitched a record 58 consecutive scoreless inning.

Television in 1969
“Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour,” filmed in Los Angeles (1967-1969), aired its final episode. The show was among the first to appeal to youth viewers with political satire and music acts like Buffalo Springfield, Pete Seeger and The Who and comedians like Steve Martin. The show was highly controversial and upset CBS executives.

Sports in 1982 
The Los Angeles Lakers defeated the Philadelphia 76ers in the 36th NBA Championship, 4-2. It was their second NBA title in three years. The film “Something To Prove,” about this series, was the last NBA video documentary to exclusively use film in all on-court action.

Jabbar, Erving and Malone Lakers vs. Sixers in NBA Finals (1982-83).

Erving, Jabbar and Malone. Lakers vs. Sixers in NBA Finals (1982-83).

Richard Riordan.

Richard Riordan.

Government in 1993
Los Angeles voters elected their first registered Republican mayor since 1961. They chose Richard Riordan over City Councilman Michael Woo.

Music in 1997
Jon Nakamatsu, age 29, of San Jose won the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in Texas. He was the first American to win this prize since 1981. 

Business in 1998
Federal Trade Commission filed a suit against Intel Corp., in Santa Clara, for using its monopoly power to bully other computer companies.

Business in 1998
Wells Fargo, in San Francisco, and Norwest Corp., in Minneapolis, reported a merger plan valued at $30-34 billion to form the nation’s 6th largest bank.

Wells Fargo Bank, San Francisco.

Wells Fargo Bank, San Francisco.

Seagate Corp.

Seagate Corp.

Business in 2005
Seagate, in Cupertino, introduced a disk drive for notebook computers that stored 160 gigabytes of data. It used technology called perpendicular recording.

Rorty in 2007
Richard Rorty, philosophy professor and author, died in Palo Alto at age 75. His books included Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (1979). 

Museums in 2008
The Contemporary Jewish Museum opened next to St. Patrick’s Church in San Francisco. Designed by Daniel Libeskind and built at a cost of $47.5 million, it was created in a former PG&E power station built in 1907.

Norse in 2009
Harold Norse, prolific Beat author, died in San Francisco at age 92. His books included Beat Hotel (1960), an experimental cut-up novel, and Hotel Nirvana: Selected Poems: 1953-1973 (1974).

Harold Norse (1972).

Harold Norse (1972).

Fabian Zaragoza.

Fabian Zaragoza.

Crime in 2011
Fabian Zaragoza, age 17, of East Palo Alto was charged with the murder of a 3-month old baby and wounding the baby’s mother. He shot at their car because he thought he saw gang members who had beaten him up. But the car belonged to a family leaving a baby shower.

Government in 2011 
Hercules voters recalled Mayor Joanne Ward, and City Councilman Donald Kuehne in a special election. They angered voters by arranging unethical business deals that benefited friends and added to the city’s financial crisis. 

June 9

St. Patrick’s Church.

St. Patrick’s Church.

Churches in 1851
Father John McGinnis celebrated mass, marking the founding of St. Patrick’s in San Francisco. The church was built on Market St. then moved in 1872 to Eddy St., where it served as the Parish Hall for Holy Cross. The wooden building is among the oldest in the city.

Transcontinental car trips in 1909 
Alice Huyler Ramsey, a 22-year-old New Jersey housewife and mother, was the first woman to drive across the US. With three female companions, none of whom knew how to drive, they piloted a Maxwell automobile 3,800 miles, leaving New York on June 9 and reaching San Francisco on August 7.

Charles E. Kingsford-Smith with Southern Cross (1928).

Charles E. Kingsford-Smith’s Southern Cross (1928).

Flight in 1928
Charles Kingsford Smith completed the first trans-Pacific flight to Australia in a monoplane named the Southern Cross. He and his crew flew from Oakland to Hawaii to Fiji to Brisbane.

 

Movies in 1934
Donald Duck made his debut dancing to the Sailor’s Hornpipe in “The Wise Little Hen.”

Movies in 1941
Production began on “The Maltese Falcon,” filmed in San Francisco and Los Angeles. It starred Humphrey Bogart as detective Sam Spade. It is considered one of the greatest films ever made.

Rosen in 1948
Nathaniel Rosen, cellist, was born in Altadena. He began training at age 6. He won international competitions, has performed around the world and currently lives in Japan.

San Francisco Giants logo.

San Francisco Giants logo.

Sports in 1963
Because of excessive heat during the day, the Houston Colt .45s played the San Francisco Giants in the first Sunday night game in major league history. San Francisco lost their seventh straight game, 3-0.

Music in 1967
Ike & Tina Turner opened for The Monkees at the Hollywood Bowl. 

The Monkees.

The Monkees.

Sports in 1980
The San Francisco Giants and Philadelphia Phillies ended their game in Philadelphia at 3:11 AM. After four rain delays and only 200 fans remained. 

Accidents in 1980
Richard Pryor, stand up comedian and actor, suffered near fatal burns at his San Fernando Valley home when a mixture of “free-base” cocaine exploded.

Amusement parks in 1984
Donald Duck marched down Disneyland’s Main Street U.S.A. in a shower of ticker tape to celebrate his 50th birthday. 

Los Angeles Lakers.

Los Angeles Lakers.

Sports in 1985
The Los Angeles Lakers beat the Boston Celtics in the 39th NBA Championship, 4-2. After the previous season’s defeat by the Celtics in the finals, the Lakers won their eighth NBA championship.

Magnin in 1988
Cyril Magnin, enormously successful businessman, political power broker and philanthropist, died in San Francisco at age 88. He was referred to as a “merchant prince.”

California state flag

California state flag

Government in 1997
Governor Pete Wilson’s salary was raised to $131,040. That made him the highest paid governor in the U.S..

Education in 2009
San Francisco School Board voted 4:3 to allow the JROTC program to satisfy PE requirements. That restored the program after a 2006 effort to eliminate it.

George Torres.

George Torres.

Crime in 2009
George Torres, Arcadia grocery store chain founder, was released on $1 million bond. A judge tossed out racketeering and conspiracy charges regarding orders for killing a rival. But Torres remained convicted of 53 lesser charges.

Environment in 2011
California officials reported that giant Central Valley water pumps killed 6 million young splittail fish last month and tens of thousands of imperiled chinook salmon since October.

Crime in 2011
Yusuf Bey, 25-year-old former head of Your Black Muslim Bakery, was found guilty of three counts of murder for ordering the killing of Oakland Post editor Chauncey Bailey and two other men in 2007. Bey had wanted Bailey dead to stop his investigation into the bakery’s finances and owner’s business practices.

Yusuf Bey.

Yusuf Bey.

June 10

Crime in 1851
The First Committee of Vigilance was formed in response to lawlessness in Gold Rush San Francisco. They hanged John Jenkins of Sydney, Australia after convicting him of stealing a safe. Next they hung an outlaw named Stuart. The Australia ex-cons belonged to an outlaw gang known as Sidney Ducks. The Committee offered a $5,000 reward for the capture of anyone found guilty of arson, and committee members patrolled the streets at night to watch for fires.

The Hanging of Stuart by the First Vigilance Committee (1851).

The Hanging of Stuart by the First Vigilance Committee (1851).

Fort Tejon.

Fort Tejon.

Treaties in 1851
The U.S. established a treaty with the Buena Vista Tribe of Kern Lake. The tribe reserved a tract between Tejon pass and Kern River and ceded the remainder of their lands. In 1862 there were 162 Indians living on the Fort Tejon Reservation.

Transportation in 1864
Trains began running on the Central Pacific Railroad from Sacramento to Newcastle.

 

Snoop Lion

Snoop Lion

Cities in 1870
Hope Ranch was founded. Today it is a private suburb next to Santa Barbara, home to rich and famous individuals. Snoop Dogg  purchased a house there in November 2006.

Crime in 1937
San Francisco police destroyed  some 400 slot machines seized in the past years then dumped them into the Bay.

Sports in 1938
Hollywood Turf Club was formed in Inglewood. Jack Warner, of Warner Brothers, was chairman. Known as Hollywood Park or Betfair Hollywood Park, the track closed in 2013 but the poker room stayed open.

Hollywood Turf Club, Inglewood.

Hollywood Turf Club, Inglewood.

Television in 1939
Barney Bear, an MGM cartoon character, debuted  in “The Bear That Couldn’t Sleep.” He appeared most recently in “Tom and Jerry’s Giant Adventure” (2013).

Government in 1947
Governor Earl Warren signed a measure giving each county authority to regulate its own air pollution. This was the first statewide air protection law in the U.S..

Music in 1966
Janis Joplin debuted with Big Brother at the Avalon Ballroom. They became mainstays in San Francisco’s psychedelic music scene that produced the Grateful Dead, Quicksilver Messenger Service and Jefferson Airplane.

Tracy in 1967
Spencer Tracy, legendary film actor, died in Beverly Hills at age 67. He appeared in 75 films, was nominated for nine Academy Awards for Best Actor and won two.

Music in 1967 
The KFRC Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival drew some 36,000 people. The event on Mount Tamalpais in Marin County began the Summer of Love.

KFRC Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival (1967).

KFRC Fantasy Fair and Magic Mountain Music Festival (1967).

Protests in 1971
Federal marshals, FBI agents and special forces swarmed Alcatraz Island and removed the Native American occupiers: five women, four children and six unarmed men.

Business in 1977
The Apple II went on sale. It was one of the first commercially successful mass-produced microcomputer. The original price was $1,298.

Apple II (1977).

Apple II (1977).

L’Amour in 1988
Louis L’Amour, author, died in Los Angeles at age 80. He wrote 116 novels, was best known for Westerns but also wrote historical fiction, science fiction, nonfiction and poetry.

Bendigo Shafter by Louis L'Amour (1983).

Bendigo Shafter by Louis L’Amour (1983).

Crime in 1991
Jaycee Lee Dugard, age 11, was kidnapped in South Lake Tahoe and rescued at age 29.

Business in 1996
Intel introduced a Pentium 200MHz processor with 0.35 micron process technology and 3.3 millions of transistors.

Intel.

Intel.

Crime in 1997
Geronimo Pratt, former Black Panther, was released after 27 years behind bars, eight years in solitary confinement. Murder charges were vacated and authorities decided against retrying him. Pratt was godfather to Tupac Shakur.

Genentech.

Genentech.

Business in 2002
A jury fined Genentech, in South San Francisco, $300 million for violating a 1976 research partnership. The funds went to the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte. 

Seal of San Francisco.

Seal of San Francisco.

Government in 2008
San Francisco supervisors approved a $3 million fund to provide rebates for residents and businesses that install solar power systems.

Government in 2009
California’s state controller said that unless Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and lawmakers quickly plugged a $24.3 billion budget gap, the state risked a financial “meltdown” within 50 days due to weak May revenues. 

Business in 2013
Apple Corp., in Cupertino, said it would equip iPhones with a “kill switch” to render them useless if stolen.

Fire in 2013
The Powerhouse Fire was contained. It burned parts of Northern Los Angeles County, mostly in the Angeles National Forest, starting on May 30, 2013. The cause is unknown.

Powerhouse Fire (2013).

Powerhouse Fire (2013).