California History Timeline, April 8 to April 15

April 8

Russians in 1806
Nokolai Rezanof anchored in San Francisco Bay. He sought supplies for the Russian-American outpost at Sitka, Alaska and hoped to discuss trade with the Spanish. During his visit to Yerba Buena, he fell in love with the teenage daughter of the commandant of the presidio, which began a tragic love story.

Round Valley Seal.

Round Valley Seal.

Indians in 1864
Round Valley Indian Rancheria was formed in Mendocino County by forcing people from different tribes from their homelands to live together. Through years of intermarriage, a common lifestyle and a shared land base, a unified community has emerged.

Newspapers in 1867
The Weekly Sutter Banner began publishing in Yuba City 
and continued through March 28, 1879.

Yuba City.

Yuba City.

Harriet Huntington Doerr.

Harriet Huntington Doerr.

Doerr in 1910 
Harriet Huntington Doerr, granddaughter of railroad tycoon Henry Edwards Huntington, was born in Pasadena. She won the American Book Award for Stones for Ibarra (1984), about a couple that leaves a house and job in San Francisco to travel to the Mexican village of Ibarra to reopen a copper mine.

Sports in 1910
Auto racing began at the wooden track Los Angeles Motordrome in Playa del Rey, the first auto speedway in the U.S..

Los Angeles Motordrome boardtrack angle.

Los Angeles Motordrome boardtrack angle.

Sports in 1916
Bob Burman, race car driver, crashed in Corona. He killed himself and three others, injuring five spectators when he rolled his open-cockpit car. His death prompted a new race car designed with a roll cage that completely enclosed the driver.

Bob Burman just before his fatal accident in 1916.

Bob Burman just before his fatal accident in 1916.

Crime in 1953 
A Federal Grand Jury in San Francisco indicted Hugh Bryson, president of the National Union of Marine Cooks and Stewards, on charges with lying about not being a communist.

Clint Eastwood in "Dirty Harry" (1971).

Clint Eastwood in “Dirty Harry” (1971).

Government in 1986 
Clint Eastwood, film star and director, was elected mayor of Carmel. He campaigned to overturn the “ice cream cone law,” restricting the sale of fast-food including ice cream cones, in the coastal tourist town.

Crime in 1989 
Charles Hughes, age 18, and Roshawn Johnson, age 20, innocent bystanders, were killed in a gang gun battle in Hunters Point. 

Trevor in 2000 
Claire Trevor, Hollywood actress, died in Newport Beach at age 90. She starred in over 60 films, including “Key Largo” (1948) and “The High and the Mighty” (1954). Trevor was called the “Queen of Film Noir” because of her appearance in many “bad girl” roles.

Intel logo (1968-2005).

Intel logo (1968-2005).

Business in 2008 
Intel, in Santa Clara, completed its first round of investment in China and planed to invest $500 million more in the next several years.

Government 2010 
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sent a notice of violation to Chemical Waste Management involving federal laws on the disposal of PCBs. Neighbors blamed the landfill near Kettleman City for at least 11 birth defects since 2007.

Kettleman City.

Kettleman City.

Architecture in 2011 
The Naval Hospital, formerly called Oak Knoll Naval Hospital in Oakland collapsed after some 800 pounds of dynamite blasted the 11-story building into a pile of rubble.

Jesus Campos.

Jesus Campos.

Crime in 2011 
Jesus Campos, owner of the popular Otaez Mexicatessen restaurant in Oakland  was shot and killed as he arrived to work.

Public health in 1991
Oakland A’s stadium became first outdoor stadium in the U.S. to ban smoking.

April 9

Cities in 1850
Santa Barbara incorporated five months before California became a U.S. state in September of 1850.

Portion of a preliminary sketch of Santa Barbara (Harrison 1853) based on the 1852 T-sheet no. 373.

Portion of a preliminary sketch of Santa Barbara (Harrison 1853) based on the 1852 T-sheet no. 373.

Plaza from atop Fort Moore Hill around 1862. Courtesy of Los Angeles Public Library.

Earliest known photo of Los Angeles, circa 1862. The view looks east over the Los Angeles Plaza from atop Fort Moore Hill around 1862. Courtesy of Los Angeles Public Library.

Post offices in 1850
U.S. Post offices opened in Los Angeles and Mission San Jose.

Government in 1856
Fresno, San Francisco, San Mateo and Tehema counties were established.

Religion in 1906
The Azusa Street Revival meeting began in Los Angeles. Led by William Seymour, an African American preacher, it began the Pentecostal movement.

Azusa Street Revival.

Azusa Street Revival.

Kelvinator (1926).

Kelvinator (1926).

Kelvinators in 1927 
The new Princess Apartments in San Francisco offered a Kelvinator electric refrigerator in every apartment. They were run from a central unit in the basement.

 

 

Transportation in 1961
The Pacific Electric Railway in Los Angeles, known as the Red Car system, ended operations. It was the largest electric railway in the world in the 1920s. Started in 1887, it connected cities in Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside Counties.

Sports in 1966
The California Angels Anaheim Stadium opened. Unofficially nicknamed the Big A, it is the fourth-oldest stadium in the major leagues.

Sports in 1974 
Ray Kroc, San Diego Padres owner, addressed fans; “Ladies & gentlemen, I suffer with you. I’ve never seen such stupid baseball playing in my life.”

Sports in 1981
Fernando Valenzuela, Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher, shut out the Houston Astros 2-0 on opening day in his rookie year. His pitching was so celebrated it became known as “Fernandomania.”

Los Angeles Lakers.

Los Angeles Lakers.

Sports in 1982
Los Angeles Lakers set a NBA regulation game record by blocking 21 of the Denver Nuggets’ shots.

 

Sports in 2001
Michelle Kwan, figure skater born in Torrance, won the Sullivan Award as the top U.S. amateur athlete.

Katrina Leung.

Katrina Leung.

Crime in 2003 
James Smith, a senior FBI counterintelligence agent, age 59, was arrested in Los Angeles along with Katrina Leung, venture capitalist, age 49, for theft and transfer of a classified defense document to the Chinese government. 

Government in 2008 
The California Supreme Court rejected San Francisco’s appeal of a lower court ruling, limiting the city’s ability regulate handguns as approved by voters in 2005.

Sports in 2008 
San Francisco officials changed the course of the Beijing Olympic torch at the last minute to avoid most protestors and spectators.

Route of the Beijing Olympic torch (2008).

Route of the Beijing Olympic torch (2008).

Cut fiber optic cables being repaired.

Cut fiber optic cables being repaired.

Crime in 2009 
Vandals in the San Jose and San Carlos cut fiber optic cables, disrupting service for hundreds of thousands of people in Santa Clara, Santa Cruz and San Benito counties.

Accidents in 2009 
Nick Adenhart, Los Angeles Angels pitcher, was killed along with two others in a car accident with a suspected drunk driver in Fullerton.

Nick Adenhart.

Nick Adenhart.

April 10

Parks in 1871 
William Hammond Hall’s maps and surveys of Golden Gate Park were accepted.

Bird's-eye view of Golden Gate Park, San Francisco (1892).

Bird’s-eye view of Golden Gate Park, San Francisco (1892).

Transportation in 1878
The California Street Cable Railroad Company started service. On opening day, 11,000 people rode the 1.7 mile line to the top of Nob Hill where the Bonanza Kings were building palatial homes.

Early San Francisco Cable Car on Clay Street, 1878. Photos: San Francisco History Center, SF Public Library.

Early San Francisco Cable Car on Clay Street, 1878. Photos: San Francisco History Center, SF Public Library.

La Fiesta de Los Aneles (1894).

La Fiesta de Los Aneles (1894).

Festivals in 1894
La Fiesta de Los Angeles began. It was the idea of business leader Max Meyberg to promote Los Angeles.

 

Movies in 1953
Warner Brothers premiered the first 3-D film from a major U.S. studio. “House of Wax,” a horror film, starred Vincent Price.

LA Dodgers. World Series pennant (1963).

LA Dodgers. World Series pennant (1963).

Sports in 1962
The Los Angeles Dodgers lost to the Cincinnati Reds in the first game at Dodger Stadium, 6-3. The stadium is the third oldest continually used park in Major League Baseball.

Sports in 1982
The Los Angeles Kings completed the largest comeback in NHL playoff history. They went from down 5-0 to win the game 6-5 in overtime. It was called the “Miracle on Manchester.”

Mei “Linda” Leung.

Mei “Linda” Leung.

Crime in 1984 
Mei “Linda” Leung, age 9, was murdered in San Francisco by Richard Ramirez, the serial killer known as the “Night Stalker.” 

Business in 1989
Intel Corp, in Santa Clara, released the 80-486 chip. It was the first x86 chip to use more than a million transistors, due to a large on-chip cache and an integrated floating-point unit.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings.

Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings.

Sports in 1991
Wayne Gretzky, of the Los Angeles Kings, scored a National Hockey League record 93rd playoff goal. 

Accidents in 1992 
Sam Kinison, 38-year-old comedian, was killed in a car crash outside Needles. He was known for intense, harsh and politically incorrect humor.

Sam Kinison.

Sam Kinison.

Science in 2001 
Doctors in San Diego implanted genetically modified cells in the brain of a woman with Alzheimer’s disease to slow her mental decline.

San Francisco protest against U.S. military presence in Iraq (2004).

San Francisco protest against U.S. military presence in Iraq (2004).

Protests in 2004 
Several thousand protesters gathered in San Francisco to call for ending U.S. military presence in Iraq.

Crime in 2004 
Isaac Espinoza, San Francisco Police officer age 29, was shot dead and his partner wounded in the Bayview neighborhood. David Hill,  arrested the next day, who used an AK-47 against the officers, was found guilty of murder.

Steve Vaught.

Steve Vaught.

Cross-country walking 2005 
Steve Vaught, age 39, left San Diego to walk to New York to lose some of his 400 pounds. He completed his walk in May, 2006 after losing around 100 pounds.

Business in 2013 
Governor Jerry Brown, on a trade mission to Beijing, announced that a Chinese investor would help pay for a $1.5 billion development deal in Oakland to transform 65 acres of industrial waterfront.

Apple Corp.

Apple Corp.

Business in 2012
Apple Inc, of Cupertino, claimed a value of $600 billion, a milestone only one other company ever achieved. That made it the largest company by market capitalization in the world.

 

April 11

Exploration in 1769
The San Antonio, Gaspar de Portola’s expedition ship anchored in San Diego Bay after 54 days at sea from Mexico. The San Carlos, her sister ship, encountered severe storms and not reach San Diego for 110 days. Both landed near present day Los Angeles before finding their way south because of an error on Vizcaino’s map from 1602.

Modoc War in 1873
U.S. Army General Edward Canby and others met with Captain Jack and other Modocs to discuss ending the war. But Canby told Captain Jack the U.S. commission could not meet his terms until orders came from Washington.

Electricity in 1895 
Anaheim completed its electric light system. It lit 145 incandescent bulbs and 22 arc lamps. Consumers paid 30 cents per kilowatt hour then — about 10 cents per kilowatt hour today.

Anaheim City Hall (1895).

Anaheim City Hall (1895).

Portrait of Luther Burbank by Frieda Kahlo (1931)

Portrait of Luther Burbank by Frieda Kahlo (1931)

Burbank in 1906
Luther Burbank, botanist and agricultural scientist, died at his Gold Ridge Farm in Sonoma County. He developed hundreds of varieties fruits, flowers, grains, grasses, and vegetables.

 

 

Japanese American internment in 1943
James Hatsuki Wakasa, 63-year-old chef, was shot and killed by a sentry at Topaz Concentration Camp. He was accused of trying to escape through a fence. It was determined he was inside the fence, facing the sentry when shot. The sentry was tried before a general court martial but found not guilty.

Remembrance Project – Topaz. Seiko Nishiyama, Untitled, 1943. Hisako Hibi, A Letter, 1945. Gift of Ibuki Hibi Lee.

Remembrance Project – Topaz. Seiko Nishiyama, Untitled, 1943. Hisako Hibi, A Letter, 1945. Gift of Ibuki Hibi Lee.

Don Drysdale. Topps baseball card (1960).

Don Drysdale. Topps baseball card (1960).

Sports in 1959
Don DrysdaleLos Angeles Dodgers pitcher, hit a home run on opening day. He was the only pitcher to hit more than one career homer in an opening day game. The Dodgers lost to the Chicago Cubs 6–1.

Sports in 1970
When the San Francisco Giants beat the Cincinnati Reds 2-1, that was the only day the Reds were not in first place that year.

Apple I computer, with a homemade wooden computer case.

Apple I computer, with a homemade wooden computer case.

Computers in 1976
The original Apple Computer, later known as the Apple I, was released. Designed and hand-built by Steve Wozniak, it was demonstrated in July at the Homebrew Computer Club in Palo Alto.

Crime in 1982 
Ronald Allen, a 32-year-old member of Your Black Muslim Bakery in Oakland, was found murdered on Easter morning. 

Sports in 1990
Mark Langston and Mike Witt, California Angels pitchers, threw a no-hit against Seattle, winning 1-0.

Protests in 1997 
Some 25,000 people marched in Watsonville to support the United Farm Workers drive to organize field laborers. Their focus began with California’s $576 million strawberry industry.

United Farm Workers Foundation.

United Farm Workers Foundation.

Stadiums in 2000 
AT&T Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, opened.

National Science Foundation.

National Science Foundation.

Computers in 2005 
Officials said U.C. Berkeley would lead a 5-year, $19 million project, funded by the National Science Foundation, to prevent hackers from penetrating U.S. computer networks.

Pointer in 2006 
June Pointer, the youngest of the Pointer Sisters, died in Los Angeles at age 52.  The sisters were famous for hits such as “Yes We Can Can” (1973) and “Wang Dang Doodle” (1974). 

Browne in 2007 
Roscoe Lee Browne, stage, film and television actor, died in Los Angeles at age 81. Known for a rich voice and dignified bearing, he appeared on “Mannix,” “All in the Family,” “Good Times,” “Sanford and Son,” “The Cosby Show,” “A Different World” and dozens of other shows.

Roscoe Lee Browne.

Roscoe Lee Browne.

Haight Ashbury Food Program.

Haight Ashbury Food Program.

Food programs in 2008 
Haight Ashbury Food Program in San Francisco closed their soup kitchen due to reduced grants and donations. It served as many as 450 people a day for some 25 years.

Environment in 2011 
In San Francisco, the Goldman Environmental prize was awarded to six people from around the world. They worked to cut pollution, resist mining, reduce reliance on nuclear power, protect a river and an island and defend wildlife.

Goldman Environmental Prize.

Goldman Environmental Prize.

Government in 2013 
California restricted use of the chemical known as Bisphenol-A (BPA), declaring it a reproductive toxicant.

Skunk Train.

Skunk Train.

Accidents in 2013 
A 40-foot section of the Skunk Train Tunnel No. 1 collapsed near Fort Bragg, blocking access to 36 miles of track to Willits.

Winters in 2013 
Jonathan Winters, comedian, died in Montecito at age 87.  He recorded comedy albums for over 50 years, receiving 11 Grammy Award nominations, winning for Best Album for Children (1975) and for Best Spoken Comedy Album for “Crank(y) Calls” (1996).

April 12

Charles Bowles, also known as Black Bart.

Charles Bowles, also known as Black Bart.

Crime in 1883
Charles Earl Bowles, English born gentleman bandit known as Black Bart, left poems at the scene of his crimes. He robbed Wells Fargo Stagecoaches 28 times. The 26th time was in Sonoma County, five miles from Cloverdale.

 

 

Military posts in 1898 
The U.S. Army transferred a military post on Yerba Buena Island in San Francisco Bay to the U.S. Navy. Today the post is a U.S. Coast Guard facility.

U.S. Coast Guard Station, Yerba Buena Island.

U.S. Coast Guard Station, Yerba Buena Island.

Military posts in 1933 
The U.S. Navy commissioned Moffatt Federal Airfield, near Sunnyvale. Hangar One, covering eight acres. became one of the world’s largest freestanding structures. NASA’s Ames Research Center was a next door. Today the airfield is leased to Google.

Historical photograph of Moffett Field's Hanger One under construction during the years of 1931-1933.

Historical photograph of Moffett Field’s Hanger One under construction during the years of 1931-1933.

Sports in 1960
The San Francisco Giants first took the field at Candlestick Park. Vice President Richard Nixon threw out the opening day ball. Candlestick was rocked on October 17, 1989, when the Loma Prieta Earthquake struck, minutes before Game 3 of the World Series was to begin.

Transportation in 1962 
San Mateo County withdrew from the San Francisco Bay Area BART district. Supervisors said their voters would be paying taxes to carry mainly Santa Clara County residents.

BART map.

BART map.

Music in 1965
The Byrds, a Los Angeles band, released Bob Dylan’s song “Mr. Tambourine Man” as a single. It became the first folk rock smash hit.

Berry in 1966        
Jan Berry of Jan and Dean was in a car crash that left him in a month-long coma. Their hit songs included “Surf City” (1963) and “Little Old lady from Pasadena” (1964).

Robinson in 1989        
Sugar Ray Robinson, middleweight boxing champion, died in Culver City at age 67. He was arguably the greatest boxer of all time. 

Sports in 2004        
Barry Bonds hit his 660th home run to tie Willie Mays for third on baseball’s career list. That sent the San Francisco Giants to a 7-5 win over the visiting Milwaukee Brewers.

Business in 2006        
Eric Schmid, CEO of Google Inc., in Mountain View, defended their cooperation with Chinese censorship as he announced creation of a Beijing research center and unveiled a Chinese-language brand name.

Marilyn Chambers.

Marilyn Chambers.

Chambers in 2009        
Marilyn Chambers, pioneer adult film actress, died in Los Angeles at age 56. She modeled for Ivory Snow detergent as a baby. But her role in “Behind the Green Door” (1972), made her famous. 

Government in 2011        
Governor Jerry Brown signed legislation requiring the state’s utilities to get 33% of its electricity from renewable sources by the end of 2020.

San Francisco thunderstorm (2012).

San Francisco thunderstorm (2012).

Weather in 2012       
Thunder storms dropped a record 1.24 inches of rain in San Francisco. The previous record was .92 inches on April 12, 2003.

April 13

Pony Express in 1860 
The first Pony Express rider from St Joseph, Missouri reached Sacramento.

Nicasio post office. Oil on canvas by Debbie Dowdle.

Nicasio post office. Oil on canvas by Debbie Dowdle.

Post offices in 1870
A U.S. post office opened in Nicasio near Tomales Bay in Marin County.

Crime in 1895        
Minnie Williams, age 21, was found raped and killed at the Emmanuel Baptist Church in San Francisco. She was last seen with Theodore Durrant, a medical student. Police then found Blanche Dumont dead in the church belfry. Durrant hanged for their murders at San Quentin in 1898. 

Theodore Durrant.

Theodore Durrant.

Movies in 1964 
Sidney Poitier became the first African-American male to win the Best Actor award at the Academy Awards in Los Angeles. He won for “Lilies of the Field” (1963).

Bert Campaneris, Oakland Athletics short stop (1970).

Bert Campaneris, Oakland Athletics short stop (1970).

Sports in 1970 
The Oakland A’s uses gold-colored bases during the club’s home opener. Rules Committee later banned them.

Nyiregyhazi in 1987        
Ervin Nyiregyhazi, Hungarian-born pianist, died in Los Angeles at age 84. He was a child prodigy when he arrived in the U.S. in 1920. He married 10 times and left behind over a 1000 largely unknown works.

Ervin Nyiregyhazi (1920).

Ervin Nyiregyhazi (1920).

Bank of America.

Bank of America.

Business in 1998        
Bank of America, in San Francisco, announced a $62.5 billion merger with NationsBank Corp. of Charlotte, North Carolina. The country’s first coast-to-coast bank would be called BankAmerica Corp. with headquarters in Charlotte.

"Monsters of Grace" (1999).

“Monsters of Grace” (1999).

Music in 1999        
“Monsters of Grace,” a digital 3-D opera composed by Philip Glass and directed by Robert Wilson, was scheduled to premier at U.C. Berkeley. Music set to love poems by the Sufi poet Rumi.

Music in 2000        
Metallica, the heavy metal rock group from Los Angeles, filed suit against Napster, headquartered in Los Angeles, for copyright infringement and racketeering.

Napster.

Napster.

Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants

Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants

Sports in 2004       
Barry Bonds hit his 661st homer, passing Willie Mays to take possession of third place on baseball’s career list.

Education in 2006        
A 29-page report faulted U.C. executives and the Board of Regents for lack of oversight in pay practices and the use of public funds.

Google.

Google.

Business in 2007        
Google, in Mountain View, announced purchase of DoubleClick, an Internet services company, for $3.1 billion.

Parks in 2007        
Gavin Newsom, San Francisco mayor, signed an agreement to ban cars from Golden Gate Park’s main road for six months and ban them permanently on Sundays from a smaller area . 

Golden Gate Park pedestrians.

Golden Gate Park pedestrians.

Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants

Barry Bonds, San Francisco Giants

Sports in 2011      
A San Francisco jury convicted Barry Bonds, baseball star, of obstructing justice regarding his use of performance-enhancing drugs. A federal appeals court upheld the felony conviction in 2013.

Business in 2011        
Dorothy Duggar, BART General Manager, resigned after accepting a severance deal worth nearly $1 million.

Sutter Health.

Sutter Health.

Crime in 2011        
California state’s insurance commissioner accused Sutter Health of fraud. It was accused of billing hundreds of millions over a decade for medical services that, sometimes, were not even provided.

April 14

Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo

Exploration in 1543
The first Spanish ships to explore the California coast returned to Navidad, Mexico after nearly a year’s journey. Juan Cabrillo, the explorer, died during the voyage but his second-in-command brought the three ships back to port.

Overland trail in 1846
The wagon train that became known as the Donner Party began their westward journey from Springfield, Missouri. The original group was three families headed by brothers, George and Jacob Donner and James Reed. Each family has three covered wagons and teamsters to drive the oxen that pulled them. The Reeds also has two servants. Other families joined along the trail. Half of them would not survive. 

Georgia and Eliza Donner with Mary Brunner (1850)

Georgia and Eliza Donner with Mary Brunner (1850)

Pony Express in 1860
The first Pony Express reached San Francisco. It was a ten-day horseback ride from St. Joseph, Missouri. 

Business in 1872
A Bar Association organized in San Francisco. The private legal organization supports San Francisco legal professionals. 

Henry Fonda in "Grapes of Wrath" (1940).

Henry Fonda in “Grapes of Wrath” (1940).

Literature in 1939
John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath was published by the Viking Press in New York. The Salinas-born author told the story of the Joad family’s journey to California through the Dust Bowl and Great Depression. 

Sports in 1964 
Sandy Koufax, Los Angeles A’s pitcher, threw his ninth complete game without allowing a walk.

Sandy Koufax. Topps Baseball Card (1964).

Sandy Koufax. Topps Baseball Card (1964).

Protests in 1967        
Thousands of people in San Francisco marched against the Vietnam war. They ended at Kezar Stadium, where 40,000 people filled the stadium.

Anti-Vietnam War protest, San Francisco (1967).

Anti-Vietnam War protest, San Francisco (1967).

KEET 13 Public Television.

KEET 13 Public Television.

Television in 1969
KEET TV channel 13 began broadcasting in Eureka. It originally operated in a garage.

Computers in 1977        
The first West Coast Computer Faire opened at San Francisco’s Civic Auditorium. At the time it was the biggest computer show in the world.

Steve Jobs showing off the first Apple II, probably at West Coast Computer Faire (1977).

Steve Jobs showing off the first Apple II, probably at West Coast Computer Faire (1977).

Space Shuttle Columbia landing at Edwards AFB (1982).

Space Shuttle Columbia landing at Edwards AFB (1982).

Flight in 1981        
Columbia 1, America’s first operational space shuttle, tested successfully by landing at Edwards Air Force Base.

Crime in 1989        
Ramon Salcido, winery worker, killed six relatives, including his wife and daughters and a coworker in Sonoma County.  

Kobe Bryant (2005).

Kobe Bryant (2005).

Sports in 2006       
Kobe Bryant broke the Los Angeles Lakers’ single-season scoring record. He hit 50 points in a victory over the Portland Trail Blazers, 110-99. That put him past Elgin Baylor’s long-standing total of 2,719 points. 

Government in 2009        
Ross Mirkarimi, San Francisco Supervisor, proposed the city sell and distribute medical marijuana.

Marijuana leaf.

Marijuana leaf.

Crime in 2010        
Federal agents in northern California charged 18 people with defrauding banks and lenders with false mortgage loan applications. Losses totaled at least $10 million from 2005 to 2009.

Hydrocodone tablets.

Hydrocodone tablets.

Crime in 2010        
Daniel Healy, a 45-year-old of Los Angeles physician, was sentenced to four years in federal prison for dispensing over a million hydrocodone tablets for cash. He made nearly $700,000 in 2008 by selling the powerful painkiller.

Government in 2011        
San Francisco supervisors learned the city’s overtime bill for the fiscal year was some $40 million; $12 million above last year.

Accidents in 2012        
Five sailors were lost In the Full Crew Farallones Race outside San Francisco. A towering wave washed them overboard as their boat rounded the Farallon Islands. Three sailors survived.

Full Crew Farallones Race.

Full Crew Farallones Race.

April 15

Fort Ross State Historic Park

Fort Ross State Historic Park

Fort Ross in 1839
The Russian Czar ordered Fort Ross closed. The Russian-American Company established the fort in 1812 as a warm water outpost for the Russian settlement in Alaska. It was eventually sold to John Sutter.

Cities in 1850
San Francisco incorporated. It is the only consolidated city-county in California, meaning the boundaries of the city and the county are the same.

San Francisco in 1850

San Francisco in 1850

Modoc War in 1873
One U.S. Army officer and six soldiers were killed and 13 soldiers wounded during days of fighting with Modoc warriors at the Stronghold. Two Modoc boys were killed when when they tried to open a cannon ball and it exploded. Several Modoc women died from sickness.

"A Modoc warrior on the war path." Stereograph by E. Muybridge.

“A Modoc warrior on the war path.” Stereograph by E. Muybridge.

Jolly Trixie.

Jolly Trixie.

Crime in 1910 
Tim Riordan, San Francisco detective, arrested Kitty Plunket, known as Jolly Trixie, for being deformed and exhibiting her deformity in a show house.

 

 

Business in 1922
The Poodle Dog Restaurant closed. The name of this San Francisco restaurant comes from Gold Rush days. ’49ers who could not say its original name, Le Poulet d’Or, nicknamed it for the dog of the wife of the Frenchman who owned the place. 

Poodle Dog Restaurant.

Poodle Dog Restaurant.

Alioto's Restaurant sign.

Alioto’s Restaurant sign.

Business in 1928 
Alioto’s Restaurant, a landmark on  San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, began with Nunzio Alioto selling lunch to Italian laborers around the wharf.

McDonald's Logo.

McDonald’s Logo.

Business in 1955 
Ray Kroc acquired McDonald’s fast food restaurants. He bought them from Richard and Maurice McDonald, who started the chain in California in 1948.

Sports in 1958
The San Francisco Giants shut out the Los Angeles Dodgers, 8-0, in the first major league baseball game in California. But the Dodgers got revenge 3 days later at the LA Memorial Coliseum before 78,672 fans.

Amusement Parks in 1973
Walt Disney Story opened at Yesterland. It closed in 2005.

The Walt Disney Story.

The Walt Disney Story.

Crime in 1974 
Symbionese Liberation Army members, including Patty Hearst, robbed the Hibernia Bank in San Francisco of more than $10,000. As they fled, they shot two people passing by.

Conte in 1975 
Richard Conte, film actor, died in Los Angeles at age 65. He was best known for roles in “I’ll Cry Tomorrow” (1955) and “The Godfather” (1972).

Richard Conte in "The Godfather" (1972).

Richard Conte in “The Godfather” (1972).

Sacramento Kings.

Sacramento Kings.

Sports in 1991
The Sacramento Kings set a National Basketball Association record by losing 35 games in-a-row on the road.

Dubroff in 1996 
Funeral services were held in Pescadero for Jessica Dubroff, the 7-year-old girl who died trying to become the youngest person to fly across America.

Jessica Dubroff.

Jessica Dubroff.

Marijuana leaf.

Marijuana leaf.

Government in 1998 
A superior court judge in San Francisco ordered the Cannabis Cultivator’s Club to close immediately. It was the nation’s largest medicinal pot dispenser. 

Parks in 2000 
President Bill Clinton created Giant Sequoia National Monument in Sequoia National Park. It protected 328,000 acres and 34 groves of Sequoias from being harvested.

Sequoia National Park, big trees trail.

Sequoia National Park, big trees trail.

Los Angeles smog.

Los Angeles smog.

Government in 2004 
The Environmental Protection Agency warned California and other states to clean up smog-plagued regions. Nationally 474 counties fell short of standards, including 36 in California.

Business in 2004 
Some Los Angeles porn-movie companies stopped production for two months following reports that two stars tested positive for AIDS.

Stanford University.

Stanford University.

Education in 2006 
Stanford University announced an online high school for gifted students. It was paid for by a gift from the Malone Family Foundation of Englewood, Colorado.

Government in 2010 
San Francisco Bay Area BART officials stripped officers of Tasers days after a sergeant fired his stun gun at a boy, age 13, on his bicycle fleeing from  police in Richmond.